Mechanical Engineering Technology

Prepare for a career as an engineering technician with an emphasis on mechanical systems.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2017 median pay for a mechanical engineering technician was $55,360 per year. Mechanical engineering deals with the design, construction and use of machines. If you are good with your hands, enjoy problem solving, and like being part of a team, you may enjoy being a mechanical engineering technician. Mechanical engineering technicians help mechanical engineers design, construct and use machinery.

General Information

Admissions Officer / Recruiter: Patricia Chase
253.680.7302 | pchase@batestech.edu

Location: Central/Mohler Campus
Hours: Mon- Fri, 7:15 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Program Length: Six Quarters

  • National Median Salary$62,230
  • National Potential Annual Job Openings7,100

This information is base on data from August 2018. For updated information, visit careeronestop, a database sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.

Tuition and Fees

At Bates, our tuition is affordable and there are options to help make it even easier to gain an education. Federal aid is available for many of our students. Scholarships are also available through the Bates Foundation.

See if you qualify for other funding through our special funding programs with the Workforce Education office.

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Note: Information is accurate as of its original posting date. The college reserves the right to edit, change, or update information as needed throughout the year. Up-to-date information is available in Student Services.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY - Option A - Associate of Applied Science: 108 Credits

For more information, please view program details on a larger device screen.

General Education Requirements

Students may choose courses from the following options to fulfill their degree requirements.

Gen Ed Group Credits Required Course ID/Name Credits
Communication 5.0 ENGL&101 - English Composition I
An expository written communication course emphasizing critical thought, reflective reading, and information literacy with attention to rules and conventions of standard American English.
5
HUM/SS/NS/O 5.0 BIOL&160 - General Biology
General Biology is intended to leave the student with an integrated view of the living world. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with exposure to and an appreciation of, basic cellular, molecular, genetic, evolutionary and ecological processes that will assist them in future advanced courses
5
BIOL&175 - Human Biology with Lab
This human anatomy and physiology course includes a brief overview of the human body for the non-science major. Basics of chemistry and cell structure are introduced and then the major systems of the human body are emphasized.
5
BIOL&241 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The first class in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&242 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&260 - Microbiology
This lab focused course is a survey of the biology of organisms too small to see without a microscope. It emphasizes the development of microscopy and culturing skills necessary to investigate the nutrition, grown, metabolism, isolation and identification of medically important bacteria. Lectures cover the concepts of microbial genetics and classification, infectious disease, immunity and immunization.
5
CHEM&121 - General Chemistry
Students in this course explore the structure of matter and how it behaves under various conditions in order to better understand the chemical world. Designed for students with little or no chemistry background. Laboratory activities and extended lecture concepts introduce the students to the experimental process.
5
CHEM&131 - Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry
Introduction to ogranic chemistry and biochemistry includes the study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions and synthesis of organic compounds and biochemistry applications in the nursing fields. The course is primarily intended for those who are interested in the application of the principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry to related areas of science, such as genetics, microbiology, physiology and nutrition.
5
CMST&102 - Introduction to Mass Media
This course critically examines core issues in the relationship between media and society, including news and entertainment media in print, electronic and digital format. Through readings, viewings, research and discussion, we examine the historical, cultural, political and economic contexts of media industries, representations and audiences.
5
CMST&152 - Intercultural Communication
This course is an introduction to the intercultural communication process and its importance in contemporary society. Students learn about the values and beliefse of a variety of cultures and develop skills to interact with people from those cultures. Emphasis is on acquiring an increased understanding of the relationship between culture and communication.
5
CMST&210 - Interpersonal Communication
This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved interpersonal communication skills and strategies.
5
CMST&220 - Public Speaking
Introduction to the rhetoric of speech and the preparation and delivery of speech in an extemporaneous style, including ethical research methods, basic rhetoric and critical analysis, and organziation of various types of presentations. Two to four speaking assignments are required, plus regular quizzes, peer review and written examination. Online resources will be integrated.
5
CMST&230 - Small Group Communications
This course is designed to increase students awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved small group communication skills and strategies.
5
ECON&201 - Microeconomics
This course focuses on the theory of the market systems as a method of allocating resources and distributing income and products. Analysis of current problems including government regulation, subsidies, monopoly and taxation
5
ECON&202 - Macroeconomics
Introduction to macroeconomics; elementary analysis of the determination of income through national income accounting. Covers macroeconomic issues including inflation, unemployment, economic growth, recessions, monetary/fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECON& 201, MATH 098, and ENGL& 101 is recommended.
5
NUTR&101 - Intro to Nutrition
Study of human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion, absorption and processing nutrients in the body; chemistry and functions of the major nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, protein; vitamin and mineral functions; food, culture and diet, energy balance, diet and metabolism; fitness and health; nutrition of the life cycle, food safety and local and world hunger issues
5
POLS&101 - Introduction to Political Science
This course is an introduction to American government and politics. Students will study the United States Constitution, governmental institutions, the political system, and the regulatory processes embedded within the document. The course format is lecture/discussion.
5
PSYC&100 - General Psychology
Introductory psychology for people with an interest in all that influences human behavior. Whether planning a career in psychology or gaining insights about yourself and others, you will find this a useful and interesting open enrollment course of study.
5
PSYC&200 - Lifespan Psychology
This course is an introduction to the various states of human development. Emphasis is on the major theories and perspectives and their relationship to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development across the lifespan.
5
SOC&101 - Introduction to Sociology
This course is a general survey of sociology, the scientific study of the group life of humans in their environment. The course introduces the basic principles of social relationships, collective behavior, and human interaction. These principles are applied to the study of culture; race, gender, and class inequality; deviance; law; social institutions; and social change.
5
Quantitative 5.0 MATH&141 - Precalculus I
In this course students solve functions, function operations, rational, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and linear functions and equation solving, function graphs, matrices and determinants, sequences and series.
5
MATH&142 - Precalculus II
Right and oblique triangle trigonometry, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities, inverse trig functions, vectors and polar coordinates, and parametric equations
5

Required Coursework

Course ID Title Prerequisites Credits
AMATH170 AMATH170 - Engineering Foundational Mathematics
This course is a modular web-enhanced progression of foundational mathematical concepts and computation: skills required for success in engineering technology fields of study. Math concepts are taught using STEM field contextual basis. Successful completion if this course is equivalent to completion of intermediate algebra and meets the pre-requisites for math courses requiring a MATH 098 Pre-requisite. Pre-requsite: MATH 087 or qualifying compass or CASA scores equivalent to MATH 092.
MATH 087 5
ENGR&111 ENGR&111 - Engineering Graphics I
This course is designed for students enrolled in an engineering program who need to learn the basic concepts of engineering graphics. Topics include two dimensional CAD use of lettering, scale, geometric construction, drawing layout, orthographic or multiview drawings and dimensioning. This course also introduces the concepts of 3-D Computer aided Drafting (CAD) solid modeling design and its application to engineering drawing.
5
ENGR&112 ENGR&112 - Engineering Graphics II
This course is an introduction to basic dimensioning techniques using mechanical orthographic, architectural plans, and civil plat drawings. Students will create manufacturing and construction drawings using industry level dimensioning techniques relating to mechanical architectural and civil disciplines applying ASME and AIA standards. This course also introduces the concepts of 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) and its application to engineering drawing. AMATH 170 (as pre or corequisite), ENGR& 111 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
5
MET105 MET105 - Orthographic Projections
Working with the glass box concept of orthogonally projecting an object to the six planes of view, students discuss the necessity of strict adherence to the American Standard Arrangement of views. First angle projection, used primarily in Europe and Asia, are also discussed
3
MET106 MET106 - Sectional Views
Students develop an acceptable drawing of section views and to crosshatch the areas sectioned with sectioning lines appropriate to the material in use
5
MET107 MET107 - Auxillary Views
Proper dimensioning practice dictates that the drafter dimension features (surfaces and angles) only in those views where they are true shapes. Using projection techniques, students normalize features found in orthogonal views
5
MET108 MET108 - Principles of Dimensioning
Students study the standards set for dimensioning set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in order to understand the principals of proper dimensioning practices. They will then apply those practices to the dimensioning of drawing previously created
4
MET110 MET110 - Dimensioning Practices
This course is essentially the lab portion of MET 108 in that students dimension all orthogonal, sectional, and auxiliary drawings that were developed in earlier courses. Particular attention is paid to strict adherence to industry standards
7
MET111 MET111 - Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
Tolerance dimensions allow the specification of a range of accuracy for the shape, size and/or position of features of a product. Students apply tolerances as they consider fit between mated parts, how features will be inspected, and how to place tolerance symbols on a drawing using CAD software
5
MET112 MET112 - Basic Geometric Constructions
Using computer-aided-drafting (CAD) software, students generate all standard geometric and conic forms. Extensive work is required in the development of tangent arcs and planes
6
MET114 MET114 - Introduction to Sketching
Engineering technicians, working in the field, are often required to hand draw parts, features of parts, and assemblies. This course teaches students to develop basic sketching skills so that they will be able to develop accurate and readable sketches
5
MET201 MET201 - Machine Shop Drawings
Students prepare to draw dimension working/production drawings necessary for machining, fabrication and/or assembly. The ability to fully annotate production drawings (general and specific notes, parts lists, and revision notes) is also an instructional objective of this course
4
MET202 MET202 - Threads, Fasteners and Springs
Students draw detailed, schematic and simplified threads for all thread forms common to industry. Thread specifications are examined thoroughly as are standard and specialized screw/bolt head types. Helical springs (compression, extension and torsion) are also examined
3
MET203 MET203 - Gears
Students study the characteristics of spur, worm, and bevel gears and learn to calculate the gear ratio and rpm of two mating spur gears. Given the pitch diameters, these gears, and their respective tooth forms, a detailed drawing is created
4
MET204 MET204 - Cams
This course provides students with the ability to develop displacement profiles for cams based upon given specifications and follower motions. A series of cams will then be drawn from these profiles
4
MET215 MET215 - Axonometric and Oblique Projections
Students learn to differentiate between types of axonometrics and to draw axonometric drawings including plan obliques and isometrics
5
MET216 MET216 - Engineering Projects II
This course is an independent study in special projects to give students additional training in a specific area selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on individual student needs to improve or expand skills in a variety of areas
7

Electives

Course ID Title Credits
MET291 MET291 - Practical Applications
This course offers students an opportunity to work on a lab-based project instead of a work-based learning component. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen. *Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET292 MET292 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET293 MET293 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5
MET294 MET294 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY - Option B - Associate of Applied Science: 108 Credits

For more information, please view program details on a larger device screen.

General Education Requirements

Students may choose courses from the following options to fulfill their degree requirements.

Gen Ed Group Credits Required Course ID/Name Credits
Communication 5.0 ENGL&101 - English Composition I
An expository written communication course emphasizing critical thought, reflective reading, and information literacy with attention to rules and conventions of standard American English.
5
HUM/SS/NS/O 5.0 BIOL&160 - General Biology
General Biology is intended to leave the student with an integrated view of the living world. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with exposure to and an appreciation of, basic cellular, molecular, genetic, evolutionary and ecological processes that will assist them in future advanced courses
5
BIOL&175 - Human Biology with Lab
This human anatomy and physiology course includes a brief overview of the human body for the non-science major. Basics of chemistry and cell structure are introduced and then the major systems of the human body are emphasized.
5
BIOL&241 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The first class in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&242 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&260 - Microbiology
This lab focused course is a survey of the biology of organisms too small to see without a microscope. It emphasizes the development of microscopy and culturing skills necessary to investigate the nutrition, grown, metabolism, isolation and identification of medically important bacteria. Lectures cover the concepts of microbial genetics and classification, infectious disease, immunity and immunization.
5
CHEM&121 - General Chemistry
Students in this course explore the structure of matter and how it behaves under various conditions in order to better understand the chemical world. Designed for students with little or no chemistry background. Laboratory activities and extended lecture concepts introduce the students to the experimental process.
5
CHEM&131 - Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry
Introduction to ogranic chemistry and biochemistry includes the study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions and synthesis of organic compounds and biochemistry applications in the nursing fields. The course is primarily intended for those who are interested in the application of the principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry to related areas of science, such as genetics, microbiology, physiology and nutrition.
5
CMST&102 - Introduction to Mass Media
This course critically examines core issues in the relationship between media and society, including news and entertainment media in print, electronic and digital format. Through readings, viewings, research and discussion, we examine the historical, cultural, political and economic contexts of media industries, representations and audiences.
5
CMST&152 - Intercultural Communication
This course is an introduction to the intercultural communication process and its importance in contemporary society. Students learn about the values and beliefse of a variety of cultures and develop skills to interact with people from those cultures. Emphasis is on acquiring an increased understanding of the relationship between culture and communication.
5
CMST&210 - Interpersonal Communication
This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved interpersonal communication skills and strategies.
5
CMST&220 - Public Speaking
Introduction to the rhetoric of speech and the preparation and delivery of speech in an extemporaneous style, including ethical research methods, basic rhetoric and critical analysis, and organziation of various types of presentations. Two to four speaking assignments are required, plus regular quizzes, peer review and written examination. Online resources will be integrated.
5
CMST&230 - Small Group Communications
This course is designed to increase students awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved small group communication skills and strategies.
5
ECON&201 - Microeconomics
This course focuses on the theory of the market systems as a method of allocating resources and distributing income and products. Analysis of current problems including government regulation, subsidies, monopoly and taxation
5
ECON&202 - Macroeconomics
Introduction to macroeconomics; elementary analysis of the determination of income through national income accounting. Covers macroeconomic issues including inflation, unemployment, economic growth, recessions, monetary/fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECON& 201, MATH 098, and ENGL& 101 is recommended.
5
NUTR&101 - Intro to Nutrition
Study of human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion, absorption and processing nutrients in the body; chemistry and functions of the major nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, protein; vitamin and mineral functions; food, culture and diet, energy balance, diet and metabolism; fitness and health; nutrition of the life cycle, food safety and local and world hunger issues
5
POLS&101 - Introduction to Political Science
This course is an introduction to American government and politics. Students will study the United States Constitution, governmental institutions, the political system, and the regulatory processes embedded within the document. The course format is lecture/discussion.
5
PSYC&100 - General Psychology
Introductory psychology for people with an interest in all that influences human behavior. Whether planning a career in psychology or gaining insights about yourself and others, you will find this a useful and interesting open enrollment course of study.
5
PSYC&200 - Lifespan Psychology
This course is an introduction to the various states of human development. Emphasis is on the major theories and perspectives and their relationship to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development across the lifespan.
5
SOC&101 - Introduction to Sociology
This course is a general survey of sociology, the scientific study of the group life of humans in their environment. The course introduces the basic principles of social relationships, collective behavior, and human interaction. These principles are applied to the study of culture; race, gender, and class inequality; deviance; law; social institutions; and social change.
5
Quantitative 5.0 MATH&141 - Precalculus I
In this course students solve functions, function operations, rational, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and linear functions and equation solving, function graphs, matrices and determinants, sequences and series.
5
MATH&142 - Precalculus II
Right and oblique triangle trigonometry, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities, inverse trig functions, vectors and polar coordinates, and parametric equations
5

Required Coursework

Course ID Title Prerequisites Credits
AMATH170 AMATH170 - Engineering Foundational Mathematics
This course is a modular web-enhanced progression of foundational mathematical concepts and computation: skills required for success in engineering technology fields of study. Math concepts are taught using STEM field contextual basis. Successful completion if this course is equivalent to completion of intermediate algebra and meets the pre-requisites for math courses requiring a MATH 098 Pre-requisite. Pre-requsite: MATH 087 or qualifying compass or CASA scores equivalent to MATH 092.
MATH 087 5
ENGR&111 ENGR&111 - Engineering Graphics I
This course is designed for students enrolled in an engineering program who need to learn the basic concepts of engineering graphics. Topics include two dimensional CAD use of lettering, scale, geometric construction, drawing layout, orthographic or multiview drawings and dimensioning. This course also introduces the concepts of 3-D Computer aided Drafting (CAD) solid modeling design and its application to engineering drawing.
5
ENGR&112 ENGR&112 - Engineering Graphics II
This course is an introduction to basic dimensioning techniques using mechanical orthographic, architectural plans, and civil plat drawings. Students will create manufacturing and construction drawings using industry level dimensioning techniques relating to mechanical architectural and civil disciplines applying ASME and AIA standards. This course also introduces the concepts of 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) and its application to engineering drawing. AMATH 170 (as pre or corequisite), ENGR& 111 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
5
MET105 MET105 - Orthographic Projections
Working with the glass box concept of orthogonally projecting an object to the six planes of view, students discuss the necessity of strict adherence to the American Standard Arrangement of views. First angle projection, used primarily in Europe and Asia, are also discussed
3
MET106 MET106 - Sectional Views
Students develop an acceptable drawing of section views and to crosshatch the areas sectioned with sectioning lines appropriate to the material in use
5
MET107 MET107 - Auxillary Views
Proper dimensioning practice dictates that the drafter dimension features (surfaces and angles) only in those views where they are true shapes. Using projection techniques, students normalize features found in orthogonal views
5
MET108 MET108 - Principles of Dimensioning
Students study the standards set for dimensioning set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in order to understand the principals of proper dimensioning practices. They will then apply those practices to the dimensioning of drawing previously created
4
MET110 MET110 - Dimensioning Practices
This course is essentially the lab portion of MET 108 in that students dimension all orthogonal, sectional, and auxiliary drawings that were developed in earlier courses. Particular attention is paid to strict adherence to industry standards
7
MET111 MET111 - Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
Tolerance dimensions allow the specification of a range of accuracy for the shape, size and/or position of features of a product. Students apply tolerances as they consider fit between mated parts, how features will be inspected, and how to place tolerance symbols on a drawing using CAD software
5
MET112 MET112 - Basic Geometric Constructions
Using computer-aided-drafting (CAD) software, students generate all standard geometric and conic forms. Extensive work is required in the development of tangent arcs and planes
6
MET114 MET114 - Introduction to Sketching
Engineering technicians, working in the field, are often required to hand draw parts, features of parts, and assemblies. This course teaches students to develop basic sketching skills so that they will be able to develop accurate and readable sketches
5
MET205 MET205 - Pneumatic/Hydraulic Symbols
Students study common pneumatic and hydraulic symbols and develop computer-aided-drafting (CAD) symbols appropriate for industry applications
3
MET206 MET206 - Piping and Instrumentation Drawings
Using the symbols developed in MET 205, students replicate industrial piping/process and instrumentation drawings (P&IDs
4
MET207 MET207 - Valve Sections
Students develop sectional views of gate, globe, and check valves displaying details of all components. Addition study of valve applications may be provided through independent work in the Fire Protection Engineering program
4
MET208 MET208 - Pump Sections
The application of various pump classes and types is examined in order to determine how they add hydraulic energy to the movement of water. As with valves in MET 207, sectional views of a variety of pumps are developed in order to facilitate the students understanding of their function
4
MET214 MET214 - Engineering Projects I
This course is an independent study in special projects to give students additional training in a specific area selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on individual student needs to improve or expand skills in a variety of areas
7
MET216 MET216 - Engineering Projects II
This course is an independent study in special projects to give students additional training in a specific area selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on individual student needs to improve or expand skills in a variety of areas
7

Electives

Course ID Title Credits
MET291 MET291 - Practical Applications
This course offers students an opportunity to work on a lab-based project instead of a work-based learning component. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen. *Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET292 MET292 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET293 MET293 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5
MET294 MET294 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY-Option C - Associate of Applied Science: 108 Credits

For more information, please view program details on a larger device screen.

General Education Requirements

Students may choose courses from the following options to fulfill their degree requirements.

Gen Ed Group Credits Required Course ID/Name Credits
Communication 5.0 ENGL&101 - English Composition I
An expository written communication course emphasizing critical thought, reflective reading, and information literacy with attention to rules and conventions of standard American English.
5
HUM/SS/NS/O 5.0 BIOL&160 - General Biology
General Biology is intended to leave the student with an integrated view of the living world. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with exposure to and an appreciation of, basic cellular, molecular, genetic, evolutionary and ecological processes that will assist them in future advanced courses
5
BIOL&175 - Human Biology with Lab
This human anatomy and physiology course includes a brief overview of the human body for the non-science major. Basics of chemistry and cell structure are introduced and then the major systems of the human body are emphasized.
5
BIOL&241 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The first class in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&242 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second in a two-quarter sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization
5
BIOL&260 - Microbiology
This lab focused course is a survey of the biology of organisms too small to see without a microscope. It emphasizes the development of microscopy and culturing skills necessary to investigate the nutrition, grown, metabolism, isolation and identification of medically important bacteria. Lectures cover the concepts of microbial genetics and classification, infectious disease, immunity and immunization.
5
CHEM&121 - General Chemistry
Students in this course explore the structure of matter and how it behaves under various conditions in order to better understand the chemical world. Designed for students with little or no chemistry background. Laboratory activities and extended lecture concepts introduce the students to the experimental process.
5
CHEM&131 - Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry
Introduction to ogranic chemistry and biochemistry includes the study of the nomenclature, structure, reactions and synthesis of organic compounds and biochemistry applications in the nursing fields. The course is primarily intended for those who are interested in the application of the principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry to related areas of science, such as genetics, microbiology, physiology and nutrition.
5
CMST&102 - Introduction to Mass Media
This course critically examines core issues in the relationship between media and society, including news and entertainment media in print, electronic and digital format. Through readings, viewings, research and discussion, we examine the historical, cultural, political and economic contexts of media industries, representations and audiences.
5
CMST&152 - Intercultural Communication
This course is an introduction to the intercultural communication process and its importance in contemporary society. Students learn about the values and beliefse of a variety of cultures and develop skills to interact with people from those cultures. Emphasis is on acquiring an increased understanding of the relationship between culture and communication.
5
CMST&210 - Interpersonal Communication
This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved interpersonal communication skills and strategies.
5
CMST&220 - Public Speaking
Introduction to the rhetoric of speech and the preparation and delivery of speech in an extemporaneous style, including ethical research methods, basic rhetoric and critical analysis, and organziation of various types of presentations. Two to four speaking assignments are required, plus regular quizzes, peer review and written examination. Online resources will be integrated.
5
CMST&230 - Small Group Communications
This course is designed to increase students awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved small group communication skills and strategies.
5
ECON&201 - Microeconomics
This course focuses on the theory of the market systems as a method of allocating resources and distributing income and products. Analysis of current problems including government regulation, subsidies, monopoly and taxation
5
ECON&202 - Macroeconomics
Introduction to macroeconomics; elementary analysis of the determination of income through national income accounting. Covers macroeconomic issues including inflation, unemployment, economic growth, recessions, monetary/fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECON& 201, MATH 098, and ENGL& 101 is recommended.
5
NUTR&101 - Intro to Nutrition
Study of human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion, absorption and processing nutrients in the body; chemistry and functions of the major nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, protein; vitamin and mineral functions; food, culture and diet, energy balance, diet and metabolism; fitness and health; nutrition of the life cycle, food safety and local and world hunger issues
5
POLS&101 - Introduction to Political Science
This course is an introduction to American government and politics. Students will study the United States Constitution, governmental institutions, the political system, and the regulatory processes embedded within the document. The course format is lecture/discussion.
5
PSYC&100 - General Psychology
Introductory psychology for people with an interest in all that influences human behavior. Whether planning a career in psychology or gaining insights about yourself and others, you will find this a useful and interesting open enrollment course of study.
5
PSYC&200 - Lifespan Psychology
This course is an introduction to the various states of human development. Emphasis is on the major theories and perspectives and their relationship to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development across the lifespan.
5
SOC&101 - Introduction to Sociology
This course is a general survey of sociology, the scientific study of the group life of humans in their environment. The course introduces the basic principles of social relationships, collective behavior, and human interaction. These principles are applied to the study of culture; race, gender, and class inequality; deviance; law; social institutions; and social change.
5
Quantitative 5.0 MATH&141 - Precalculus I
In this course students solve functions, function operations, rational, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and linear functions and equation solving, function graphs, matrices and determinants, sequences and series.
5
MATH&142 - Precalculus II
Right and oblique triangle trigonometry, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities, inverse trig functions, vectors and polar coordinates, and parametric equations
5

Required Coursework

Course ID Title Prerequisites Credits
AMATH170 AMATH170 - Engineering Foundational Mathematics
This course is a modular web-enhanced progression of foundational mathematical concepts and computation: skills required for success in engineering technology fields of study. Math concepts are taught using STEM field contextual basis. Successful completion if this course is equivalent to completion of intermediate algebra and meets the pre-requisites for math courses requiring a MATH 098 Pre-requisite. Pre-requsite: MATH 087 or qualifying compass or CASA scores equivalent to MATH 092.
MATH 087 5
ENGR&111 ENGR&111 - Engineering Graphics I
This course is designed for students enrolled in an engineering program who need to learn the basic concepts of engineering graphics. Topics include two dimensional CAD use of lettering, scale, geometric construction, drawing layout, orthographic or multiview drawings and dimensioning. This course also introduces the concepts of 3-D Computer aided Drafting (CAD) solid modeling design and its application to engineering drawing.
5
ENGR&112 ENGR&112 - Engineering Graphics II
This course is an introduction to basic dimensioning techniques using mechanical orthographic, architectural plans, and civil plat drawings. Students will create manufacturing and construction drawings using industry level dimensioning techniques relating to mechanical architectural and civil disciplines applying ASME and AIA standards. This course also introduces the concepts of 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) and its application to engineering drawing. AMATH 170 (as pre or corequisite), ENGR& 111 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
5
MET105 MET105 - Orthographic Projections
Working with the glass box concept of orthogonally projecting an object to the six planes of view, students discuss the necessity of strict adherence to the American Standard Arrangement of views. First angle projection, used primarily in Europe and Asia, are also discussed
3
MET106 MET106 - Sectional Views
Students develop an acceptable drawing of section views and to crosshatch the areas sectioned with sectioning lines appropriate to the material in use
5
MET107 MET107 - Auxillary Views
Proper dimensioning practice dictates that the drafter dimension features (surfaces and angles) only in those views where they are true shapes. Using projection techniques, students normalize features found in orthogonal views
5
MET108 MET108 - Principles of Dimensioning
Students study the standards set for dimensioning set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in order to understand the principals of proper dimensioning practices. They will then apply those practices to the dimensioning of drawing previously created
4
MET110 MET110 - Dimensioning Practices
This course is essentially the lab portion of MET 108 in that students dimension all orthogonal, sectional, and auxiliary drawings that were developed in earlier courses. Particular attention is paid to strict adherence to industry standards
7
MET111 MET111 - Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
Tolerance dimensions allow the specification of a range of accuracy for the shape, size and/or position of features of a product. Students apply tolerances as they consider fit between mated parts, how features will be inspected, and how to place tolerance symbols on a drawing using CAD software
5
MET112 MET112 - Basic Geometric Constructions
Using computer-aided-drafting (CAD) software, students generate all standard geometric and conic forms. Extensive work is required in the development of tangent arcs and planes
6
MET114 MET114 - Introduction to Sketching
Engineering technicians, working in the field, are often required to hand draw parts, features of parts, and assemblies. This course teaches students to develop basic sketching skills so that they will be able to develop accurate and readable sketches
5
MET209 MET209 - Production Drawings
Given duct system characteristics for airflow requirements. Students complete these drafting projects in cooperation with the Sheet Metal Technology program
4
MET210 MET210 - Duct Fitting Symbols
Students study common sheet metal duct fittings and develop computer-aided-drafting (CAD) symbols appropriate for industry applications
3
MET211 MET211 - Flat Pattern Development
Using the principles of triangulation and radial line development, students develop flat patterns for such common types of sheet metal fittings as elbows and transitions
5
MET212 MET212 - Basic Air Flow Systems
Students study the means by which air is distributed in mechanically ventilated spaces by means of fans, ductwork, and diffusers
3
MET214 MET214 - Engineering Projects I
This course is an independent study in special projects to give students additional training in a specific area selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on individual student needs to improve or expand skills in a variety of areas
7
MET215 MET215 - Axonometric and Oblique Projections
Students learn to differentiate between types of axonometrics and to draw axonometric drawings including plan obliques and isometrics
5
MET216 MET216 - Engineering Projects II
This course is an independent study in special projects to give students additional training in a specific area selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on individual student needs to improve or expand skills in a variety of areas
7

Electives

Course ID Title Credits
MET291 MET291 - Practical Applications
This course offers students an opportunity to work on a lab-based project instead of a work-based learning component. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen. *Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET292 MET292 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-13
MET293 MET293 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5
MET294 MET294 - Independent Projects
This course offers students an opportunity to work independently on a project that is determined by both the instructor and the student. The project should be based on prior course work and should result in the achievement of advanced learning in the subject area chosen.*Intructor Approval Required
1-5

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY - Associate of Applied Science-Transfer: 106 Credits

For more information, please view program details on a larger device screen.

General Education Requirements

Students may choose courses from the following options to fulfill their degree requirements.

Gen Ed Group Credits Required Course ID/Name Credits
Communication 5.0 ENGL&101 - English Composition I
An expository written communication course emphasizing critical thought, reflective reading, and information literacy with attention to rules and conventions of standard American English.
5
HUM/SS/O 15.0 CMST&102 - Introduction to Mass Media
This course critically examines core issues in the relationship between media and society, including news and entertainment media in print, electronic and digital format. Through readings, viewings, research and discussion, we examine the historical, cultural, political and economic contexts of media industries, representations and audiences.
5
CMST&152 - Intercultural Communication
This course is an introduction to the intercultural communication process and its importance in contemporary society. Students learn about the values and beliefse of a variety of cultures and develop skills to interact with people from those cultures. Emphasis is on acquiring an increased understanding of the relationship between culture and communication.
5
CMST&210 - Interpersonal Communication
This course is designed to increase students' awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved interpersonal communication skills and strategies.
5
CMST&220 - Public Speaking
Introduction to the rhetoric of speech and the preparation and delivery of speech in an extemporaneous style, including ethical research methods, basic rhetoric and critical analysis, and organziation of various types of presentations. Two to four speaking assignments are required, plus regular quizzes, peer review and written examination. Online resources will be integrated.
5
CMST&230 - Small Group Communications
This course is designed to increase students awareness of the value and impact of utilizing improved small group communication skills and strategies.
5
ECON&201 - Microeconomics
This course focuses on the theory of the market systems as a method of allocating resources and distributing income and products. Analysis of current problems including government regulation, subsidies, monopoly and taxation
5
ECON&202 - Macroeconomics
Introduction to macroeconomics; elementary analysis of the determination of income through national income accounting. Covers macroeconomic issues including inflation, unemployment, economic growth, recessions, monetary/fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECON& 201, MATH 098, and ENGL& 101 is recommended.
5
NUTR&101 - Intro to Nutrition
Study of human nutrition and health. Topics include digestion, absorption and processing nutrients in the body; chemistry and functions of the major nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, protein; vitamin and mineral functions; food, culture and diet, energy balance, diet and metabolism; fitness and health; nutrition of the life cycle, food safety and local and world hunger issues
5
POLS&101 - Introduction to Political Science
This course is an introduction to American government and politics. Students will study the United States Constitution, governmental institutions, the political system, and the regulatory processes embedded within the document. The course format is lecture/discussion.
5
PSYC&100 - General Psychology
Introductory psychology for people with an interest in all that influences human behavior. Whether planning a career in psychology or gaining insights about yourself and others, you will find this a useful and interesting open enrollment course of study.
5
PSYC&200 - Lifespan Psychology
This course is an introduction to the various states of human development. Emphasis is on the major theories and perspectives and their relationship to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development across the lifespan.
5
SOC&101 - Introduction to Sociology
This course is a general survey of sociology, the scientific study of the group life of humans in their environment. The course introduces the basic principles of social relationships, collective behavior, and human interaction. These principles are applied to the study of culture; race, gender, and class inequality; deviance; law; social institutions; and social change.
5
Natural Science 20.0 CHEM&121 - General Chemistry
Students in this course explore the structure of matter and how it behaves under various conditions in order to better understand the chemical world. Designed for students with little or no chemistry background. Laboratory activities and extended lecture concepts introduce the students to the experimental process.
5
Quantitative 25.0 MATH&141 - Precalculus I
In this course students solve functions, function operations, rational, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and linear functions and equation solving, function graphs, matrices and determinants, sequences and series.
5
MATH&142 - Precalculus II
Right and oblique triangle trigonometry, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, identities, inverse trig functions, vectors and polar coordinates, and parametric equations
5
MATH&151 - Calculus
Limits and limit laws, continuity, tangents and rates of change, derivatives using definition and differentiation rules for polynomial, exponential, trigonometric, logarithmic and transcendental functions, max/min problems, LHospitals rule, Newtons method and antidifferentiation.
5
MATH&152 - Calculus II
Course content includes the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite and indefinite integrals, methods of integration, applications of integration, and improper integrals. The course also includes an introduction to first order differential equations, antiderivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, and methods of integration.
5
MATH&153 - Calculus III
Emphasizes the study of infinite sequences and series including power series. Topics include plane analytic geometry, graphing in polar coordinates, and an introduction to vectors.
5

Required Coursework

Course ID Title Prerequisites Credits
AMATH170 AMATH170 - Engineering Foundational Mathematics
This course is a modular web-enhanced progression of foundational mathematical concepts and computation: skills required for success in engineering technology fields of study. Math concepts are taught using STEM field contextual basis. Successful completion if this course is equivalent to completion of intermediate algebra and meets the pre-requisites for math courses requiring a MATH 098 Pre-requisite. Pre-requsite: MATH 087 or qualifying compass or CASA scores equivalent to MATH 092.
MATH 087 5
CS&141 CS&141 - Computer Science 1 Java
This is an advanced course for Visual Basic.NET, an object-oriented, event-driven language that is a subset of the Visual Studio.NET environment. It is designed to provide programmers familiar with the basic concepts and functionality of Visual Basic.NET with the tools to create more robust application programs.
5
ENGR&111 ENGR&111 - Engineering Graphics I
This course is designed for students enrolled in an engineering program who need to learn the basic concepts of engineering graphics. Topics include two dimensional CAD use of lettering, scale, geometric construction, drawing layout, orthographic or multiview drawings and dimensioning. This course also introduces the concepts of 3-D Computer aided Drafting (CAD) solid modeling design and its application to engineering drawing.
5
ENGR&112 ENGR&112 - Engineering Graphics II
This course is an introduction to basic dimensioning techniques using mechanical orthographic, architectural plans, and civil plat drawings. Students will create manufacturing and construction drawings using industry level dimensioning techniques relating to mechanical architectural and civil disciplines applying ASME and AIA standards. This course also introduces the concepts of 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) and its application to engineering drawing. AMATH 170 (as pre or corequisite), ENGR& 111 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
5
ENGR&214 ENGR&214 - Statics
A fundamental course in the mechanics of rigid bodies in static equilibrium conditions. Solves practical engineering problems involving the loads carried by structural components using Static principles, vector notation and calculus for mathematical modeling. Teaches principles and their limitations within the context of Engineering applications and the engineering design process. Students must take MATH&153 (as pre or corequisite), PHYS&223 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
Physics&122, Math&152 5
ENGR191 ENGR191 - Engineering Technology Study Lab I
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the first quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. College navigation topics, including financial aid, workforce funding, childcare, library services. Soft skill topics of coping with pressure and decision making.
1
ENGR192 ENGR192 - Engineering Technology Study Lab II
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the second quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. Create a social media profile that is geared towards employment. Soft skill topics of drive for excellent results and cooperative teamwork
ENGR191 1
ENGR193 ENGR193 - Engineering Technology Study Lab III
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the third quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. Cover letters, resume, and related employment documents prepared. Complete mock interviews and receive feedback. Soft skill topics of initiative and flexibility.
ENGR192 1
ENGR194 ENGR194 - Engineering Technology Study Lab IV
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the fourth quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. Apply for internships, attend local networking or online gatherings. Participate in industry related discussions either through discussion groups or social media. Soft skill topics of influential communication and continuous learning.
ENGR193 1
ENGR195 ENGR195 - Engineering Technology Study Lab V
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the fifth quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. Complete applications to transfer colleges or employers. Soft skill topics of decision-making and strategic vision.
ENGR194 1
ENGR196 ENGR196 - Engineering Technology Study Lab VI
Students meet with their cohort once a week in a lab setting for personalized support from instructors to complete contextualized projects spanning the sixth quarters engineering coursework. Additional career preparation training and resources will be provided as students progress toward graduation. Use feedback and finalize resumes, cover letters, polished social media presence. Soft skill topics of planning and organizing and integrity and respect.
ENGR195 1
MET218 MET218 - Introduction to 3 D Modeling
This course is an introduction to creating 3D CAD models using feature-based, parametric solid-modeling design; base, boss and cut features using extruded, revolved, simple swept and lofted shapes; capturing design intent using automatic or user-defined geometric and dimensional constraints; detail and assembly drawings.
ENGR&111, ENGR&112 5
MET260 MET260 - Advanced CAD Operations
This is an advanced CAD systems course, including 3D concepts, are used to produce engineering drawings using layers, masks, and groups. symbols and x-references are applied.
ENGR&111, ENGR&112 5

Engineering Technology - Certificate of Training: 15 Credits

For more information, please view program details on a larger device screen.

Required Coursework

Course ID Title Prerequisites Credits
AMATH170 AMATH170 - Engineering Foundational Mathematics
This course is a modular web-enhanced progression of foundational mathematical concepts and computation: skills required for success in engineering technology fields of study. Math concepts are taught using STEM field contextual basis. Successful completion if this course is equivalent to completion of intermediate algebra and meets the pre-requisites for math courses requiring a MATH 098 Pre-requisite. Pre-requsite: MATH 087 or qualifying compass or CASA scores equivalent to MATH 092.
MATH 087 5
ENGR&111 ENGR&111 - Engineering Graphics I
This course is designed for students enrolled in an engineering program who need to learn the basic concepts of engineering graphics. Topics include two dimensional CAD use of lettering, scale, geometric construction, drawing layout, orthographic or multiview drawings and dimensioning. This course also introduces the concepts of 3-D Computer aided Drafting (CAD) solid modeling design and its application to engineering drawing.
5
ENGR&112 ENGR&112 - Engineering Graphics II
This course is an introduction to basic dimensioning techniques using mechanical orthographic, architectural plans, and civil plat drawings. Students will create manufacturing and construction drawings using industry level dimensioning techniques relating to mechanical architectural and civil disciplines applying ASME and AIA standards. This course also introduces the concepts of 2D and 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) and its application to engineering drawing. AMATH 170 (as pre or corequisite), ENGR& 111 (as a pre or corequisite), or instructor permission.
5

Engineering Technology Certificate of Training (15 credits), prepares individuals toapply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineersengaged in a wide variety of projects. Includes instruction in various engineeringsupport functions for research, production, and operations, and applications tospecific engineering specialties, including civil, mechanical, electronic, architectural,chemical, and petroleum engineering.

At the successful completion of the program curriculum, students will be able to:

  1. Apply principles of mathematics and applied science to perform technical calculations and solve technical problems.
  2. Visualize 3D objects and draw them in 2D, both by sketching and through the use of computer-aided drafting software.
  3. Analyze a loaded beam.
  4. Collect and analyze experimental data.
  5. Analyze a body in motion and describe using position, velocity, and acceleration.
  6. Identify characteristics of steel, ceramics, and plastics.
  7. Design and carry out experiments.
  8. Identify and apply appropriate standards necessary to complete a project.
  9. Produce a complete set of drawings sufficient to manufacture a part, including dimensions and tolerances.
  10. Solve engineering problems through computer modeling, employing an engineering computer language, and hand calculations.
  11. Conduct standard tests, collect data, and apply results to improve processes.
  12. Design systems, components, or processes.
  13. Function professionally and with ethical responsibility as an individual and on multidisciplinary teams.

In addition, the following college-wide learning outcomes reflect the guiding expectations of all programs at Bates Technical College:

  • Human Diversity
  • Effective Communication
  • Critical Thinking

Bates instructors are industry experts who enjoy working with and teaching students.

Instructors

  • Curt Meyer

    253.680.7344 | Email